Monday, August 04, 2014

A Doctor Honoris Causa from the University Claude Bernard Lyon honor

A Doctor Honoris Causa from the UCBL honor


Professor Tejinder (Jim) Virdee from Imperial College London, who UCBL awarded in 2013 the title of Honoris Causa of the University, was knighted by the Queen of England on 14 June 2014.
Virdee
Professor Virdee, now Professor Sir Jim Virdee, is one of the most renowned physicists of the United Kingdom.

After working on the UA1 experiment at CERN nobélisée, which highlighted the W and Z bosons, he was one of the creators of the CMS experiment at the LHC at CERN. He has worked extensively in this respect with members of the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lyon , where he came to give a seminar entitled "The Quest for the Higgs Boson at the Large Hadron Collider" in late 2013. Responsible for international CMS collaboration until 2010, its contribution to the discovery of the Higgs boson was essential.

Sir Jim Virdee is also a great promoter of science. He has participated in many projects, particularly in Africa, India and the BBC.

It should be noted that Professor Sir Tom Kibble, also Emeritus Professor at Imperial College, whose work led to the prediction of the existence of this particle and is thus considered to be one of the fathers of the boson Higgs was knighted at the same time.

The Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lyon, through its director and many colleagues, extends its warmest congratulations to Professor Sir Jim Virdee!

Sir J. Virdee with Sir T. Kibble

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Eastern Eye, Asian Voice, The Daily Telegraph, Calcutta, Monday 7 July 2014 Indian High Commission London

  • Sir Modest people: Ranjan Mathai (centre) with Tejinder Virdee (second from left), Vatsala (fourth from left) and other members of the family





















Ranjan Mathai, the Indian high commissioner, held a reception at India House last week for Dr Yusuf Hamied, to celebrate his honorary doctorate of science from Cambridge University, and Prof. Sir Tejinder Virdee, who was knighted by the Queen for his services to science — in Geneva, Tejinder built the detector that was crucial in finding the Higgs boson fundamental particle.
Also present was Tejinder's colleague from Imperial, (Chennai-born) Prof. Sir Tom Kibble, 81, who was knighted at the same time for his seminal paper and work on the Higgs boson.

Monday, June 23, 2014

Midsummer Knight's Dream

Midsummer Knight’s Dream

Invitation for dinner to celebrate


Saturday, 21 June 2014, 7pm


At home with  Vatsala  Tejinder
Dress code: Summer Smart



RSVP 

Friday, June 20, 2014

A knight in Paradou, Provence 13 June - 15 June 2014

Celebrating in Paradou by the poolside next to Brian's Boozle Bar on hearing the news of the Knighthood late evening 13 June 2014.
Drinking the very first bottle of celebratory Champagne!
Who's hiding the bottle of beer?
Who is drinking the beer?
Not me!
Anna, Vatsala, Tejinder and Brian 

Surrounded by aces of olive trees and lavender fields.
Anna and Brian are under their shady veranda covered in vines leaves overlooking the panoramic countryside. It's Monday 16 June, at their fabulous country estate holding up the article about the Knighthood in The Telegraph, Calcutta which actually mentions we are in Provence! Something to be chuffed about eh! A good reason to take a photo!
One two three pick up move shuffle and place!

Seaside lunch at Les Vagues at St Marie de la Mer Saturday 14 June 2014 just before dipping into the Mediterranean for a very very cold swim!  It took me at least 10 minutes to dare put my whole body in the water it was that cold! I just couldn't catch my breath enough to dip in immediately cause the icy water of the Med just took it all away! Outside temperature was a scorching hot 37C! Phew! The water was Wonderful! Refreshing! And since it was so sunny and hot that day we ended up moving this lunching table all over the place.  One, two, three, pick up, move, shuffle and place catching the shade to stay firmly under the gigantic parasol.  Here we are in 4th position eating sea bream, wild rice and ratatouille, rose de Provence &
Who's drinking beer?
Not me!

Thursday, June 19, 2014

Knighthood for Professor Tejinder (Jim) Virdee FRS

Knighthood for Professor Tejinder (Jim) Virdee FRS

Saturday 14 June 2014 London, England
Tejinder (Jim) Virdee has been honoured with a knighthood for services to science. This was announced on the Queen’s 2014 Birthday Honours list on 14th June.
Jim said, "It was a complete surprise to me when I heard the news. To be frank it took a while for it to really sink in” adding “I am humbled and delighted”.
The long citation reads, “Professor Virdee is one of the UK's most distinguished physicists and, as one of the creators of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment, he has made outstanding contributions to science. The CMS experiment, at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN, Geneva, has delivered seminal results in particle physics, including, and along with the ATLAS experiment, the groundbreaking discovery of the Higgs Boson. Beyond his innovative work in particle physics, he is also a great campaigner for science, and promoter of science and education in Africa and India.”

Jim added that, “Many thousands of brilliant scientists and engineers have worked on both experiments to make these results, and the Higgs discovery, possible. In particular I have had the pleasure and the honour to work closely with the many colleagues who have created the technological wonder that we call CMS.”

Jim has played a key role in all phases of CMS; the conceptual design, construction, commissioning and exploitation of physics and continues to be actively involved in the experiment. Looking ahead he says “no doubt next year will be another one filled with suspense for CMS as we again start to search for new physics at the higher energies”. He is also looking to the longer-term future of CMS with the proposal for a high granularity silicon based endcap calorimeter.
He continued “The discovery of a Higgs boson is only the end of one chapter in experimental particle physics.  We are about to embark on another new exciting one hopefully one that will reveal new unknown physics phenomena in the next more higher energy run of CMS.
Professor Tom Kibble, also from Imperial College London, has been knighted as well. Tom is one of six distinguished researchers whose pioneering theoretical work in 1964 revealed the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking with the prediction of the Higgs boson, most likely to be the one we discovered in July 2012. Our warmest congratulations to Jim and Tom.




Jim at P5 CMS Control Room, Cessy France, at the startup of CMS in 2009

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

BIRTHDAY HONOURS 2014 DIPLOMATIC SERVICE AND OVERSEAS LIST

BIRTHDAY HONOURS 2014 
 DIPLOMATIC SERVICE AND OVERSEAS LIST 

 NOTES ON HIGHER AWARDS 

 ORDER OF ST MICHAEL AND ST GEORGE 

KCMG 


Brendan GORMLEY MBE

Lately Chief Executive, Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC). For services to the UK
emergency humanitarian response to disaster-affected people overseas

Brendan Gormley has been instrumental in the work to help save and improve millions of
lives around the world. He became DEC’s first Chief Executive in 2000 following a 24-year
period working for Oxfam. His leadership has brought transformational change with an
informal partnership growing into an internationally renowned British institution. He is
recognised for his long-term contribution to helping some of the poorest communities
overseas particularly those affected by major disasters like the 2004 Tsunami and Haiti
earthquake, with DEC having raised over £1billion.

Christopher HOHN

Founder and UK Foundation Trustee, The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF).
For services to UK philanthropy and international development

Chris Hohn set up the The Children’s Investment Fund Foundation in 2002 and, as the sole
benefactor, has led its expansion to become the UK’s largest private charity for international
development that works to improve the lives of children in poverty in developing countries.
CIFF has made some of the largest single donations in the areas of HIV/AIDs, emergency
humanitarian aid, climate change, disease eradication and malnutrition positioning the UK as
a leader in global food security and nutrition and enhancing the UK’s reputation for
leadership on international development.

Philip LOWE

Lately Director General, European Commission, Brussels. For services to European policy

Philip Lowe has made a major contribution to the work of the European Commission since
he joined in 1973 when the UK joined the European Community. He has served as Director
General in Development, Competition and most recently Energy as well as Chef de Cabinet
to Commissioners Bruce Millan and Neil Kinnock. Philip Lowe has played a leading role over
a long and sometimes complex period including the financial crisis, during which he has
worked to enhance competitive markets through the European Union.

 


Simon McDONALD CMG

HM Ambassador, Germany. For services to British foreign policy and British interests in
Germany

Simon McDonald, whose career spans 30 years, has contributed significantly to enhancing
the important bilateral relationship with Germany since he took on this role in 2010. His
achievements in Germany have included leading a step change for British business which
has helped the UK become Germany’s leading trading partner as well as his work through
the Eurozone crisis, building on a longer term career including as HM Ambassador to Israel
and Foreign Policy Adviser to the Prime Minister.

Sebastian WOOD CMG

HM Ambassador, China. For services to British prosperity and British interests in China

Sebastian Wood has provided exceptional vision and leadership to the British representation
in China, one of HMG’s largest networks overseas, advancing British interests particularly
UK prosperity, investment and financial services, digital diplomacy, human rights, climate
change, the Olympics and enhancing the network of British Missions across China, building
on a 28-year career including as Director Asia Pacific, FCO and Private Secretary to Lord
Wilson, former Cabinet Secretary.

KNIGHT BACHELOR 

Professor Tejinder Singh VIRDEE

Professor of Physics, Imperial College, London. For services to science

Professor Virdee is one of the UK's most distinguished physicists and, as one of the creators
of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment he has made outstanding contributions to
science. The CMS experiment, at the Large Hadron Collider, CERN, Geneva, has delivered
seminal results in particle physics, including, and along with the ATLAS experiment, the
groundbreaking discovery of the Higgs Boson. Beyond his innovative work in particle
physics, he is also a great campaigner for science, and promoter of science and education in
Africa and India.

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

Royal Honours Professors Sir Tom and Sir Tejinder



Eminent physicists receive royal honours



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Two of Imperial's physicists, best known for predicting and finding the Higgs boson, have been knighted in this year's Queen's Birthday honours list.
Emeritus Professor Sir Tom Kibble, whose work led to the prediction of the mass-giving particle, and Professor Sir Tejinder (Jim) Virdee, who led on the design and construction of one the detectors that found the Higgs Boson, have been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Both scientists are from the Department of Physics at Imperial College London.
kibble
Emeritus Professor Sir Tom Kibble
The Birthday Honours are bestowed by the Queen as part of the celebration of her official birthday.  Philip Dilley - a member of Imperial’s Council and Chairman of Arup Group - has also received a Knighthood. Captain David Peter HENSON, Corps of Royal Engineers, who is also studying for his MSc in Biomedical Engineering in the Department of Bioengineering, has received an MBE.
Professor James Stirling, Provost of Imperial College London, who is also a theoretical particle physicist, said: “I am delighted to hear that two of my longstanding friends and esteemed colleagues in the field of physics have been recognised with these great honours. The immense contributions that Tom and Jim have made to physics are undeniable, but I take particular pleasure in congratulating them because I have first-hand experience from my own research of the profound influence that their visionary ideas have had. I feel privileged to have worked alongside them and I have no doubt that I am joined by the entire physics community in celebrating their richly-deserved success.”
I feel privileged to have worked alongside them and I have no doubt that I am joined by the entire physics community in celebrating their richly-deserved success.
– Professor James Stirling
Provost, Imperial College London
Professor Tom Kibble is an eminent theoretical physicist whose pioneering work in the 1960s led to the mass-giving particle theory, which has come to be known as the 'Higgs mechanism'.
Alongside contributions from Peter Higgs, François Englert, and other physicists, Professor Kibble published the third research paper in 1964 that described how elementary particles acquire mass.
Their visionary ideas led to the eventual detection of a Higgs boson particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, for which Higgs and Englert received the Nobel Prize in 2013. This prediction is one of the most important moments in scientific history.
In 2008 the paper in which Professor Kibble first theorised the existence of the Higgs boson, Global conservation laws and massless particles, was selected as one of the most important papers of the last 50 years by the leading journal Physical Review Letters.

Professor Sir Tom Kibble said: "I was very gratified by this public recognition of the work that for me has been a continual enjoyment.  My children were delighted, and are all keen to attend the investiture if they possibly can.  Since the announcement I have dealt with a huge stream of congratulatory emails.  My only regret is that my wife, who died almost a decade ago, could not have been here to join in the celebrations, which she would have thoroughly enjoyed.  An added bonus was to learn that the same honour was to be conferred on my friend and colleague Jim Virdee, whose work in designing, building and operating one of the huge detectors that found the Higgs boson I have long greatly admired."
Jim
Professor Sir Tejinder Virdee
Researchers at Imperial not only predicted the famous theory. They have also been central to the engineering of detectors built to find and verify the existence of the Higgs boson.
One of the UK’s most distinguished scientists, Professor Tejinder Virdee spearheaded the concept and design of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, which is one of two of the main detectors of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Professor Virdee oversaw the construction of CMS and until 2010 was CERN’s lead spokesperson for the experiment.
In July 2012, results from the CMS experiment, together with another detector ATLAS, confirmed the existence of the elusive particle proving the theoretical work performed by both Professor Kibble and today's Nobel Prize-winning physicists.
Professor Virdee is an eminent innovator in the field of particle physics, but his knighthood also recognises his work campaigning for and promoting better science education in Africa and India.

Professor Sir Tejinder Virdee said: “I was in my office in Geneva when I found out about the knighthood, which took me by surprise. It's really humbling and I'm truly honoured to be acknowledged in this way. Many brilliant scientists and engineers have worked tirelessly over two decades to make the discovery of a Higgs boson possible. I’ll definitely be celebrating over a glass of champagne with my family and friends.”

The Telegraph Calcutta, Knight toasts 'Sir' in glory

Knight toasts ‘Sir’ in glory

Tejinder Virdee
London, June 16: To Sir with love: in his moment of triumph, when it was announced on Saturday that professor Tejinder Virdee had been honoured with a knighthood “for services to science” in the Queen’s birthday honours list, he did not forget the schoolteacher who gave him his passion for physics.
Born into a Sikh family in the foothills of the mountains of Nyeri in Kenya on October 13, 1952, Virdee was 15 when he came to England with his parents and siblings in 1967 and was taught physics by a teacher called Howard Stockley at King’s Norton Boys’ Grammar School in Birmingham.
Stockley was especially demanding when it came to Virdee. “Certain teachers have a gift of empathising with students, helping them out — and giving them wings to fly,” recalled Virdee. “I understood why he was so demanding — he expected a lot of me.”
The citation from Buckingham Palace set out why Stockley’s student is today Sir Tejinder Virdee: “Professor Virdee is one of the UK’s most distinguished physicists and, as one of the creators of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment he has made outstanding contributions to science. The CMS experiment, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), CERN, Geneva, has delivered seminal results in particle physics, including, and along with the ATLAS experiment, the groundbreaking discovery of the Higgs Boson. Beyond his innovative work in particle physics, he is also a great campaigner for science, and promoter of science and education in Africa and India.”
In 2012, Virdee and his wife Vatsala went to Birmingham to meet Stockley, who was then 80. It turned out to be a final goodbye, for Stockley was injured in a fall a few weeks later and died in hospital. It was an emotional meeting between guru and shishya. Virdee was touched to discover his old teacher had followed his progress from afar over the years. As Virdee left, Stockley bid him a tearful farewell.
On Saturday, Virdee and his wife were spending the weekend in France with friends in a picturesque village in Provence.
“I cannot believe it!” exclaimed Lady Virdee as she will now be called. “So excited! We are so delighted, we are so happy! And it is such a shock. Actually we are in the south of France in the most beautiful village in Paradou in Provence — something we had planned before we got this amazing news. We have got olive groves, beautiful trees and lavender and just about to go to the seaside and going swimming — a great way to spend our day.”
She passed the phone to her husband for whom the knighthood had been a “complete surprise”.
He revealed that in memory of “Sir”, he had been in touch with the headmaster at his old school in Birmingham.
“It is funny but I have been trying to set up a prize under his name at the school and it is only last week that I talked to the headmaster — I had sent him some messages earlier — and he replied. And so there will be a £100 prize for the best student in physics at that school at the end of A levels named after Howard Stockley — the Howard Stockley Prize.”
Virdee added: “My father would have also been very proud but he passed away a few years ago. Of course, my mum’s very happy.”
As for his work, there is much to be done in Geneva.
He is chairman of a review panel that is examining the data from when a Higgs Boson particle was found two years. “We are finishing the analysis and going to publish the final results.”
The LHC is also being geared up to do a new round of experiments next year. All this will be in pursuit of what Virdee calls “the new physics”. An attempt will be made to resolve the unified field theory first mooted but not completed by Albert Einstein.
He emphasised scientists had found “a Higgs Boson” and not necessarily “the Higgs Boson” since there were five.
“I am also working on innovative technology for replacement of one part of the detector which will improve its capability,” said Virdee. “We are looking 10 years ahead to 2025 so the aim is to maintain CMS as one of the most powerful instruments ever built.”
The Hollywood actress Angelina Jolie was among other notable people to be honoured. She was made a Dame but it is an honorary title and cannot be used before her name as she is a US national.
Jolie was recognised for her campaign against the systematic use of rape as a weapon of terror in war. Jolie, a special envoy of the UN high commissioner for refugees, was in London last week to co-chair a global summit, End Sexual Violence in Conflict (ESVC), with William Hague, the British foreign secretary.
Commenting on the honour, Jolie said: “To receive an honour related to foreign policy means a great deal to me, as it is what I wish to dedicate my working life to. Working on the Preventing Sexual Violence Initiative and with survivors of rape is an honour in itself. I know that succeeding in our goals will take a lifetime, and I am dedicated to it for all of mine.”
Jolie won worldwide admiration last year when she disclosed she had undergone a preventive double mastectomy because she carried the “faulty” gene BRCA1, which sharply increased her risk of developing breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
Her partner Brad Pitt described her decision as “absolutely heroic”.

Eminent Physicists receive royal honours

Eminent physicists receive royal honours

main image
shadow
Two of Imperial's physicists best known for predicting and finding the Higgs boson have been knighted in this year's Queen's Birthday honours list.
Emeritus Professor Sir Tom Kibble, whose work led to the prediction of the mass-giving particle, and Professor Sir Tejinder (Jim) Virdee, who led on the design and construction of one the detectors that found the Higgs Boson, have been recognised in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Both scientists are from the Department of Physics at Imperial College London.
kibble
Emeritus Professor Sir Tom Kibble
The Birthday Honours are bestowed by the Queen as part of the celebration of her official birthday. Philip Dilley - a member of Imperial’s Council and Chairman of Arup Group - has also received a Knighthood.
Professor James Stirling, Provost of Imperial College London, who is also a theoretical particle physicist, said: “I am delighted to hear that two of my longstanding friends and esteemed colleagues in the field of physics have been recognised with these great honours. The immense contributions that Tom and Jim have made to physics are undeniable, but I take particular pleasure in congratulating them because I have first-hand experience from my own research of the profound influence that their visionary ideas have had. I feel privileged to have worked alongside them and I have no doubt that I am joined by the entire physics community in celebrating their richly-deserved success.”
I feel privileged to have worked alongside them and I have no doubt that I am joined by the entire physics community in celebrating their richly-deserved success.
– Professor James Stirling
Provost, Imperial College London
Professor Tom Kibble is an eminent theoretical physicist whose pioneering work in the 1960s led to the mass-giving particle theory, which has come to be known as the 'Higgs mechanism'.
Alongside contributions from Peter Higgs, François Englert, and other physicists, Professor Kibble published the third research paper in 1964 that described how elementary particles acquire mass.
Their visionary ideas led to the eventual detection of a Higgs boson particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva, for which Higgs and Englert received the Nobel Prize in 2013. This prediction is one of the most important moments in scientific history.
In 2008 the paper in which Professor Kibble first theorised the existence of the Higgs boson, Global conservation laws and massless particles, was selected as one of the most important papers of the last 50 years by the leading journal Physical Review Letters.
Jim
Professor Sir Tejinder Virdee
Researchers at Imperial not only predicted the famous theory. They have also been central to the engineering of detectors built to find and verify the existence of the Higgs boson.
One of the UK’s most distinguished scientists, Professor Tejinder Virdee spearheaded the concept and design of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, which is one of two of the main detectors of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Professor Virdee oversaw the construction of CMS and until 2010 was CERN’s lead spokesperson for the experiment.
In July 2012, results from the CMS experiment, together with another detector ATLAS, confirmed the existence of the elusive particle proving the theoretical work performed by both Professor Kibble and today's Nobel Prize-winning physicists.
Professor Virdee is an eminent innovator in the field of particle physics, but his knighthood also recognises his work campaigning for and promoting better science education in Africa and India.